“Last week I made the last wild garlic tart of the year. I do look forward to spotting the first leaves and taking full advantage”

Letter from a friend

 

You may enjoy the visual treat of a sea of bluebells beginning to carpet a forest. And, at the same time (or slightly earlier – late February to early March) you may be unaware of a culinary treat growing up nearby – wild garlic loves the same moist soil and shady, newly green-mantled trees. Together with rhubarb and asparagus, wild garlic is, a harbinger of spring, of variety and abundance to come.

You can identify it by its smell and long pointed leaves (see the clip at the bottom of this post for how to make sure you’ve found the right thing if you are foraging – you don’t want to confuse it with the poisonous Lily of the Valley, or anything else which won’t do you any good). A rather easier solution is to buy them at farmers’ markets and local green grocers.

 

what to do with wild garlic

You can buy wild garlic at farmers’ markets, local green grocers, and, inevitably, of course, at Borough Market.

 

At the end of the season, in April, (when the leaves are past their best from an eating point of view) this garlic produces its own flowers, producing an impressive woodland carpet of white to rival the bluebells. The flowers (milder than the leaves) are edible, and make a beautiful garnish. They can be pickled in sugar, cider vinegar and peppercorns; use as you might capers, sprinkled over fish, salads, or as an exotic touch to Vitello Tonnato.

 

what to do with wild garlic

The flowers are both beautiful and tasty.

 

Wild garlic – beloved of bears

Wild garlic is also known as ramsons and broad-leaved garlic. Its scientific name is Allium Ursinum (literally bear onion) because brown bears seem to be partial. The plant is a close relative of domestic chives, and it’s indicative of ancient woodlands.

 

Keeping wild garlic

Wild garlic leaves will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for a couple of days, or in a glass with some water in the fridge for a little longer. You can also freeze wild garlic leaves.

 

what to do with wild garlic

You can freeze wild garlic leaves.

 

You can buy wild garlic infused vinegar (or you could try making your own – follow a similar method to that used for rhubarb vinegar).

 

wild garlic

Wild garlic infused vinegar is one of Burren Balsamics impressive range.

 

You can do all kinds of things with wild garlic – but it’s much better cooked – here are some ideas:

  • Remove stems and blanch it for a minute or so as you would spinach. If you refresh in iced water you will retain
  • Blanch briefly (as above), chop and serve with pâté and toast
  • Make a soup with some fried onion, cooked potato and vegetable stock. After simmering together about ten minutes, season, add the wild garlic leaves, blend, and serve, garnished with nigella seeds and crumbled feta.
  • Add to potatoes and chorizo to make a frittata or omelette.
  • Add to quiches and tarts
  • Incorporate into onion bhajis, and serve with wild-garlic-added raita
  • Or add to other dips
  • Or to mayonnaise…or, an idea from Pete Biggs, head chef at Nathan Outlaw at Al Mahara, Dubai, blend blanched wild garlic with rapeseed oil and use to make mayonnaise
  • Mix in with fried bacon and serve with any grilled white fish
  • Mix with cream cheese, add to croutons, and use to give a finishing touch to all kinds of soups – broccoli, cauliflower, or spinach.
  • Incorporate into risottos
  • James Mackenzie, chef at the Pipe And Glass Inn makes a black pudding and langoustine crumble with a wild garlic crust
  • Rob Cowen, writing in The Telegraph, adds his to bubble and squeak
  • make a hummous of it by blending together with broad beans and a little oil and lemon juice
  • blend with basil, mint, capers, anchovies, a little coriander seed and oil and lemon to make a salsa verde
  • add to a Chakchouka
  • As they do at Benedicts in Norwich; make a sauce of the wild garlic, and serve with grilled asparagus and frozen, grated Granny Smith apple.
  • Or, you can make this pesto……

 

 

You may enjoy the visual treat of a sea of bluebells beginning to carpet a forest. And, at the same time (or slightly earlier – late February to early March) you may be unaware of a culinary treat growing up nearby – wild garlic loves the same moist soil and shady, newly green-mantled trees. Together with rhubarb and asparagus, wild garlic is, a harbinger of spring, of variety and abundance to come. You can identify it by its smell and long pointed leaves (see the clip at the bottom of this post for how to make sure you’ve found the right thing if you are foraging – you don’t want to confuse it with the poisonous Lily of the Valley, or anything else which won’t do you any good). At the end of the season, in April, (when the leaves are past their best from an eating point of view) this garlic produces its own flowers, producing an impressive woodland carpet of white to rival the bluebells. The flowers (milder than the leaves) are edible, and make a beautiful garnish. They can be pickled in sugar, cider vinegar and peppercorns; use as you might capers, sprinkled over fish, salads, or as an exotic touch to Vitello Tonnato. Wild garlic is also known as ramsons and broad-leaved garlic. Its scientific name is Allium Ursinum (literally bear onion) because brown bears seem to be partial. Wild garlic leaves will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for a couple of days, or in a glass with some water in the fridge for a little longer. You can also freeze wild garlic leaves. You can do all kinds of things with wild garlic – but it’s much better cooked – here are some ideas: Blanch it for a minute or so as you would spinach. If you refresh in iced water you will retain Blanch briefly (as above), chop and serve with pâté and toast Make a soup with some fried onion, cooked potato and vegetable stock. After simmering together about ten minutes, season, add the wild garlic leaves, blend, and serve, garnished with nigella seeds and crumbled feta. Add to potatoes and chorizo to make a frittata or omelette. Add to quiches Incorporate into onion bhajis, and serve with wild-garlic-added raita Or add to other dips Or to mayonnaise…or, an idea from Pete Biggs, head chef at Nathan Outlaw at Al Mahara, Dubai, blend blanched wild garlic with rapeseed oil and use to make mayonnaise Mix in with fried bacon and serve with any grilled white fish Mix with cream cheese, add to croutons, and use to give a finishing touch to all kinds of soups – broccoli, cauliflower, or spinach. Incorporate into risottos James Mackenzie, chef at the Pipe And Glass Inn makes a black pudding and langoustine crumble with a wild garlic crust Rob Cowen, writing in The Telegraph, adds his to bubble and squeak Or, you can make this pesto. Saucy Dressings’ Recipe for Wild Garlic Pesto Ingredients 90g/3 oz wild garlic leaves 30g/¼ cup pine nuts or walnuts 450g/1 lb Parmesan 2 fat cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed with 2½ tsp smoked salt 180 – 240 ml/¾-1 cup olive oil 20g/1 oz flat leaf parsley 1 tbsp lemon juice Method Blitz all together. Serve as a dip, a sauce for fish or pasta….over potatoes. If you make the stiffer version (less olive oil) you can serve it, almost like pâté, with toast or crackers. How to identify wild garlic

wild garlic pesto

Saucy Dressings’ Recipe for Wild Garlic Pesto

Ingredients

  • 90g/3 oz wild garlic leaves
  • 30g/¼ cup pine nuts or walnuts
  • 450g/1 lb Parmesan
  • 2 fat cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed with 2½ tsp smoked salt
  • 180 – 240 ml/¾-1 cup olive oil
  • 20g/1 oz flat leaf parsley
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

Method

  1. Blitz all together.

 

making wild garlic pesto

Simply blitz all together in the blender….

 

Serve as a dip, a sauce for fish or pasta….over potatoes. If you make the stiffer version (less olive oil) you can serve it, almost like pâté, with toast or crackers.

It freezes well (freeze into ice cubes), so you can try out all these ideas!

 

How to identify wild garlic